judy hart is writing a book 


​​​Judy Hart launched the Park with her suggestion in 1978 that the Park Service needed a new park on the history of women. After finding the Seneca Falls site, she worked on the study, wrote the legislation and lobbied for it. When US Congress voted to authorize the Park, she moved there to be the founding Superintendent.


The Wesleyan Chapel, site of the 1848 Convention that began the women's rights movement, had devolved to a dilapidated laundromat in 1978, the year of the first planning visit. The Home of Elizabeth Cady Stanton had been so drastically altered that it had to be taken down to the studs before it could be put back together again.


ABOUT THE wOMEN'S RIGHTS NATIONAL PARK IN SENECA FALLS, nEW YORK: 

About her idea that started it all, then  The early work WITH LEGISLATION AND CONGRESS,  then MOVING TO SENECA FALLS TO BE THE FOUNDING SUPERINTENDENT

In 1848 five women met for a tea party. They decided to call a convention to demand equal rights for women, including the right to vote. Three hundred gathered in the Wesleyan Chapel and read the Declaration of Sentiments. This was so outrageous that it became national news and began the women's rights movement.  


The National Park also includes the home of organizer Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and the Hunt home where they tea party was held, and the Mcclintock home where the Declaration of Sentiments was written, and a Visitor Center. 


​ Judy Hart is now writing a book to tell this story.
Her deep desire is to inspire other women to dream their biggest dreams and turn them into reality, no matter who says it is impossible.